Yearly Archives

2019

Participants are needed for a new Alzheimer’s disease clinical trial at UC Irvine and UCLA.

By Commentary

People ages 50 and older who have memory problems are needed for a new clinical trial for Mild Cognitive Impairment and Alzheimer’s disease at the University of California, Los Angeles and University of California, Irvine. The NEAT study is a clinical trial sponsored by the University of California “Cures for Alzheimer’s Initiative,” testing whether nicotinamide, a component of vitamin B3, can slow Alzheimer’s disease. Specifically, the 12-month study is investigating if a high daily dose of nicotinamide can affect the brain tangles associated with Alzheimer’s disease. The study also measures whether nicotinamide is effective in improving memory and other thinking…

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Forgetful Yet Unforgettable: The Legacy of an Alzheimer’s Patient

By Commentary, In the News

In an interview with UCI undergraduate students, Chelsea Cox, Associate Director of Eduction for UCI MIND, shares her personal journey with Alzheimer’s disease, her perspective on care and research, and how people – young and old – can get involved in the cause. “…No one should have to spend their final days that way. This experience is what motivated me to get involved in Alzheimer’s research and education. So that hopefully, one day, other people don’t have to go through what my family went through.” Read the full interview on Medium >

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What causes memory problems in older adults?

By Community Events

Tune in this Friday, March 1 @ 9AM for the next episode of our monthly Facebook LIVE series, “What causes memory problems in older adults?” This month, we’re joined by Ahmad Sajjadi, MD, PhD, Assistant Professor of Neurology in the UCI School of Medicine. Dr. Sajjadi received his medical degree from Tehran University of Medical Sciences in Iran and his PhD from the University of Cambridge in the UK. Dr. Sajjadi is a behavioral neurologist who sees patients with memory concerns and also conducts research on Alzheimer’s disease and atypical forms of dementia. To attend live and ask questions, login…

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FDA issues warning to dietary supplements making unproven claims

By Commentary, In the News

On February 11, the FDA issued a statement and 12 warning letters related to an aggressive change in the agency’s regulation of dietary supplements. The statement was outlined in the New York Times. The main objective of the new approach is enhanced protection of consumers from mislabeled and unproven claims about treatment of disease. At the core of the problem are a number of companies that specifically target people with Alzheimer’s disease and people who are concerned about developing Alzheimer’s disease. A list of the companies receiving warning letters, as well as links to the letters, can be found here.

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Leslie Thompson gets $6 million CIRM grant to advance Huntington’s disease treatments

By In the News

  UCI News, January 30, 2019 – “Leslie Thompson of the Sue & Bill Gross Stem Cell Research Center and UCI MIND has been awarded $6 million by the California Institute for Regenerative Medicine to continue her CIRM-supported efforts to create stem cell treatments for Huntington’s disease. The funding will allow the Thompson lab to conduct the late-stage testing needed to apply to the U.S. Food and Drug Administration for permission to start a clinical trial in people. The therapy involves transplanting stem cells that have been turned into neural stem cells and shown to improve the function of brain cells in…

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New play aims to educate community on Down syndrome

By Community Events, In the News

Eric Doran, Manager of UCI MIND’s Down Syndrome Program, has partnered with his longtime friend and playwright, Steven Oberman, to tell the true story of Dr. John Langdon Down, the man who first described Down syndrome. We interviewed Mr. Doran to learn more about the vision behind this new play, Blurred at the Edges, set to run in March of 2019 at the Diversionary Theatre in San Diego. What is the vision behind Blurred at the Edges? Down syndrome is named after Dr. John Langdon Down, a British physician who first described the condition in 1866. Most parents of a…

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The Rise of Pseudomedicine for Dementia and Brain Health

By Commentary, In the News

Contributed by Joshua Grill, PhD, Director of UCI MIND Colleagues at the UCSF Memory and Aging Center published a timely critique in JAMA on a concerning and increasing practice in the United States. “Pseudomedicine” is a practice whereby qualified healthcare professionals prescribe supplements or other therapies that are not covered by insurance, and therefore require cash payments, for personal financial gain. Pseudomedicine is especially problematic among older patients and family members concerned about memory loss and desperate for effective therapies to slow or stop the progression of Alzheimer’s disease. Other examples of pseudomedicine include recommendations for brain healthy diet plans…

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NPR asks founding director to comment on exercise study

By Carousel Slider, In the News

A study was recently published in the journal Neurology about physical activity’s relation to Alzheimer’s disease and cognition in older adults. NPR asked UCI MIND founding director Dr. Carl Cotman to comment on this impressive study, noting that exercise might “‘offset the ill effects of brain degeneration.’ He adds that lifestyle interventions such as an increase in physical activity and movement can be powerful even in the presence of disease.” Click here to read the article > Dr. Cotman is leading a national clinical trial of exercise at UCI MIND. The trial aims to evaluate whether 18 months of moderate to…

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Sleep is associated with tau pathology in early Alzheimer’s disease

By Community Events, In the News

Colleagues at Washington University School of Medicine published novel findings on the correlation between tau tangles, a hallmark of Alzheimer’s disease pathology, and sleep quality in people who were cognitively normal or who had mild cognitive impairment. On ALZFORUM, UCI MIND faculty member, Dr. Bryce Mander commented, “This is an important paper because it shows for the first time how tau is related to sleep deficits. That’s going to be important in advancing our understanding of how Alzheimer’s disease pathology affects sleep.” Dr. Mander, Assistant Professor of Psychiatry & Human Behavior at UCI, has published several important findings on the link between…

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Washington Post article highlights need for Latino representation in Alzheimer’s clinical studies (Written in English & Spanish)

By Commentary

Washington Post article highlights need for Latino representation in Alzheimer’s clinical studies Contributed by Christian Salazar, PhD, UCI MIND Associate Project Scientist A rare form of Alzheimer’s disease, caused by a gene mutation first discovered among people living in Jalisco, Mexico, develops at much earlier age than typical cases of Alzheimer’s disease. Andres Martin, a 31-year old Marine, has this ‘Jalisco mutation’, and is committed to raising awareness that the fight against Alzheimer’s disease does not only impact older adults. He’s especially motivated to protect those like his daughter, Alexis, a 2-year old who has a 50% chance of inheriting…

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Dr. Ira Lott, Director of UCI MIND Down Syndrome Program, featured in OC Business Journal

By Carousel Slider, In the News

Dr. Ira Lott, Director of the UCI MIND Down Syndrome Program, discussed the connection between Down syndrome and Alzheimer’s disease with the Orange County Business Journal this week.  Dr. Lott and his team conduct critical research studies with volunteer participants to improve understanding of brain aging and dementia in Down syndrome. Click here to read the article > To learn more about studies in Down syndrome and Alzheimer’s disease, click here >

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Critical need for diversity in Alzheimer’s disease research

By Commentary, In the News

Contributed by Joshua Grill, PhD, Director of UCI MIND In a new study, colleagues at the Alzheimer’s Disease Research Center at Washington University have found that levels of the cerebrospinal fluid protein tau, one of the hallmark pathologies in Alzheimer’s disease (AD), is lower in African Americans compared to Whites. This was true both for older participants who did and did not have memory problems. The study is not the first to find such differences between African Americans and Caucasians and it has important implications to a number of important areas of AD research. First, there is a growing movement…

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