Skip to main content
Yearly Archives

2021

New genetically modified mouse model mimics multiple aspects of human Alzheimer’s disease

By Carousel Slider, Commentary, In the News

NIA-supported scientists have developed a new mouse model that produces a form of the human beta-amyloid protein, a hallmark of Alzheimer’s disease. An important research tool, mouse models enable the exploration of genetic, environmental, and behavioral aspects of Alzheimer’s, as well as make it possible to test drug candidates before human studies. The new mouse model, which was reported in a recent article in Nature Communications, can be used by other scientists to advance Alzheimer’s research. Model Organism Development and Evaluation for Late-Onset Alzheimer’s Disease (MODEL-AD) MODEL-AD consortium Many factors, including gene changes, the aging process, and conditions in the…

Read More

María M. Corrada, ScM, ScD at AAIC 2021

By Commentary, Community Events, In the News

UCI MIND at #AAIC María M. Corrada, ScM, ScD contributes: In The Life After 90 Study, a one-of-a-kind multiethnic cohort of individuals 90 and older, memory concerns appear to identify individuals with objective cognitive impairment but do not identify those whose cognition may decline faster. With additional enrollment and longer follow-up, we will continue to explore the utility of memory concerns in predicting future cognitive performance and potential ethnoracial differences in a segment of the population that is often excluded from research.

Read More

UCI MIND Director speaks on AAIC panel about impact and ethics of Aduhelm approval

By Commentary, In the News

UCI MIND Director, Joshua Grill, PhD spoke today as part of a panel on the impact of drug approval on future clinical trials at the AAIC Annual Conference in Denver, CO. Dr. Grill presented on the ethical considerations needed for designing studies in the presence of an approved drug like Aduhelm.  To learn more about this topic, read the recent paper he co-authored with Dr. Jason Karlawish in Neurology

Read More

Dr. Vivek Swarup featured on ALZFORUM

By Commentary, In the News

UCI MIND researcher, Dr. Vivek Swarup is gaining significant attention for his work on glial cell gene expression in AD. His lab’s research, published in Nature Genetics 2 weeks ago was recently featured on the heavily trafficked Alzheimer’s research website, Alzforum.com – a testament to the impact his research has on the broader AD community. Dr. Swarup used prefrontal cortex brain tissue from UCI ADRC brain donors to examine differences in glial cell gene transcription between healthy and AD brains.   He found that the areas in the DNA above important AD risk genes, responsible for expressing those genes, were different…

Read More

Aducanumab update

By Carousel Slider, Commentary, In the News

Contributed by Joshua Grill, PhD and Jason Karlawish, MD UCI MIND Director Joshua Grill, PhD co-authored an article in Nature Reviews Neurology about the FDA’s decision on Aduhelm. Read more on this below: Since the FDA approved Aduhelm (aducanumab) on June 7, there has been considerable conversation, debate, and even backlash about the decision. It may seem difficult to keep up. Here is a recap of some of the most recent important events. The FDA granted Aduhelm what is known as “accelerated approval.” This means that the approval did not indicate that the drug has been adequately shown to benefit…

Read More

New Mouse Model Provides 1st Platform to Study Late-Onset Alzheimer’s

By Carousel Slider, Commentary, In the News

UCI School of Biological Sciences Dean Frank LaFerla is co-senior author of a study involving a new genetically engineered mouse model that, unlike its predecessors, is based on the most common form of Alzheimer’s disease. This could help lead to major strides in the fight to end this deadly disease! Dean LaFerla discusses his findings in a new podcast: https://www.bio.uci.edu/frank-laferla-podcast/

Read More

Swarup Lab research published in Nature Genetics

By Carousel Slider, Commentary, In the News

Contributed by Vivek Swarup, PhD The brain is made up of billions of cells that are tightly coordinated in complex neural circuitry and are ultimately responsible for manifesting our memories, emotions, and personalities: the very essence of being human. Alzheimer’s Disease (AD) is one of the most prevalent neurodegenerative disorders worldwide and results in cognitive decline and memory loss, and we presently do not have effective treatments for AD. There is a pressing need to deepen our understanding of AD, and by studying how individual cells are changing in disease, or identifying those that are resilient to such changes, we…

Read More

UCI student selected for prestigious research program

By Commentary, In the News

Leslie Vazquez-Rangel, a fourth-year undergraduate at UCI was recently selected to participate in the prestigious Minority Access to Research Careers (MARC) Program, an NIH funded training grant that is awarded to only 640 students across the US each year. The program will allow a select few PhD-bound honors students like Leslie to engage in meaningful research under the guidance of world-renowned professors.  Leslie will spend the next year working with Dr. Elizabeth Head, a professor in the Department of Pathology to study the link between Down syndrome and Alzheimer’s disease. To learn more about Leslie and the incredible research being done in Dr. Head’s lab, visit https://sites.mind.uci.edu/headlab

Read More

A crucial, overlooked question on the new Alzheimer’s drug: When should patients stop taking it?

By Carousel Slider, Commentary, In the News

A crucial, overlooked question on the new Alzheimer’s drug: When should patients stop taking it? STAT News – June 24, 2021 “When we enroll families in studies of treatments like aducanumab, we try to educate them that they should not expect large improvements in cognition or function,” Joshua Grill, director of the Institute for Memory Impairments and Neurological Disorders at the University of California, Irvine, said in an email to STAT. The drug can’t stop disease progression, only potentially slow it, a change that he warns would likely be imperceptible. “If we can’t expect families to know if the drug…

Read More

UCI-led meta-analysis identifies hypertension medications that help ward off memory loss

By Carousel Slider, Commentary, In the News

People taking drugs that cross the blood-brain barrier experienced less cognitive decline June 21, 2021 The research conducted by Daniel Nation, UCI associate professor of psychological science, and Jean Ho, a postdoctoral scholar at the UCI Institute for Memory Impairments and Neurological Disorders, included more than 12,800 people over the age of 50 in 14 separate studies carried out across six countries. Steve Zylius / UCI Irvine, Calif., June  21, 2021 — A large-scale meta-analysis led by University of California, Irvine researchers provides the strongest evidence yet of which blood pressure medications help slow memory loss in older adults: those that can…

Read More

Furor rages over FDA approval of controversial Alzheimer’s drug

By Carousel Slider, Commentary, In the News

“My greatest concern is around people with families with Alzheimer’s disease,” said Joshua D. Grill, an Alzheimer’s researcher at the University of California at Irvine. “Few can afford the financial burden in the first place, let alone the additional costs of Aduhelm.” He said the cost of an amyloid PET scan was at least $5,000. “Doctors, families, even we researchers need more guidance,” Grill said. Spinal taps offer a more affordable way of determining amyloid levels, but some patients shy away from them.

Read More

Alzheimer’s treatment study seeks volunteers, including two sites in Portland

By Carousel Slider, Commentary, In the News

KATU News: “We all have to do more because this is about the most important medical problem we face as a society today,” said Dr. Josh Grill, a member of the AHEAD Study leadership team and director of the UC Irvine Institute for Memory Impairments and Neurological Disorders. Grill said his AHEAD Study team is testing a new investigational treatment, examining whether they can slow slow or stop the earliest brain changes due to Alzheimer’s disease in people with a higher risk of developing the disease later in life. The team is seeking volunteers on its website: https://www.aheadstudy.org/ “All research…

Read More

The problem with post-approval required studies

By Commentary, In the News, Participants

Contributed by Daniel Gillen, PhD Earlier today, the FDA granted approval of Biogen Inc’s aducanumab, to be sold under the brand name Aduhelm, to treat the underlying cause of AD.  As I wrote back in November of 2020, multiple issues in the clinical program for aducanumab make objective assessment of the clinical efficacy of the drug difficult. I was not alone as the FDA advisory committee also noted them. The first obvious issue is that the two parallel Phase 3 trials, called studies 301 and 302, that this approval is based on were discrepant in their results. Generally speaking, FDA…

Read More

The FDA has approved aducanumab (Aduhelm™). Now what?

By Commentary, In the News, Participants

Contributed by Joshua Grill, PhD Today, June 7, the US Food and Drug Administration approved aducanumab, a monoclonal antibody against beta amyloid, the protein that builds up in the brain of a person with Alzheimer’s disease. It has been more than 15 years since the last approval of an Alzheimer’s drug. Unlike the previously approved therapies, aducanumab directly targets the biological changes in the brain caused by Alzheimer’s disease. The data that the FDA used to decide to approve aducanumab were controversial, resulting from three clinical trials – one Phase 1B trial and two large Phase 3 trials. The controversy…

Read More

How to fight off boredom in retirement

By Carousel Slider, Commentary, In the News

MarketWatch As we age, our already limited attention span shrinks even more. So it takes extra discipline for seniors to stay curious. … Craig Stark, [professor of neurobiology and behavior], a memory researcher at University of California, Irvine, urges people who want to stay mentally sharp to “feed your brain novel information.” Curiosity can provide the impetus to gather that new information.

Read More

Protecting the aging beagle brain

By Commentary, In the News

Contributed by Hamsi Radhakrishnan Organ transplant recipients are significantly less likely to develop dementia compared to the general population; perhaps because the drugs they take to suppress their immune system to prevent donor organ rejection could also be curbing neuroinflammation. To assess whether these drugs could be repurposed as dementia-preventing medication in middle-aged adults, we studied the effects one year treatment with the FDA-approved immunosuppressant Tacrolimus had on the beagle brain. Using advanced diffusion MRI, we found that tacrolimus protected against aging-related microstructural changes that are often associated with cognitive decline, specifically in the hippocampus, parahippocampal cortex, prefrontal cortex and…

Read More

MIND Matters | Quarterly Newsletter | Spring 2021

By Commentary, Community Events, COVID-19, In the News, Participants

Message from the Director Dear Friends of UCI MIND, Spring has sprung and there is much to look forward to. COVID-19 infections remain low in Orange County. We are grateful to our colleagues from UCI Health who have done an incredible job of caring for people during the pandemic and navigating us toward an end through well-organized vaccination programs. We are planning resumption of our pre-pandemic research activities. The campus has reduced restrictions on in-person research while maintaining essential safety parameters. There is a collective sense of eagerness to “catch-up” on work delayed by the pandemic. This will include UCI…

Read More

Curiosity Is Key for Keeping Your Memory in Top Shape as You Age—Here Are 4 Exercises That Are Better Than Brain Games

By Carousel Slider, Commentary, In the News

UCI MIND Faculty Member Christine Gall, PhD, a neuroscientist and professor of anatomy and neurobiology at UC Irvine’s School of Medicine, explains that our brains contain specialized cells, or neurons, that are responsible for sending and receiving information. Much like a circuit board in a computer, our brains create networks of neurons that transmit electrical activity when we engage in just about anything. These charges, AKA synapses, are critical for learning and memory.

Read More

32nd Annual SoCal Alzheimer’s Disease Research Conference

By Event Slider

JOIN US FOR A FREE VIRTUAL CONFERENCE: “Alzheimer’s from all angles” About the Conference Join Alzheimer’s Orange County and UCI MIND for the 32nd Annual Southern California Alzheimer’s Disease Research Conference. This free, half-day, virtual conference will cover a wide range of topics concerning Alzheimer’s disease, from updates on research, to treatments, diagnostics, risk factors, and genetic resilience. The impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on brain health will also be discussed. Friday, September 10, 2021, 8AM-12PM PT Free and open to the public Livestreamed on Facebook and YouTube Who Should Attend? Healthcare Providers Senior and Social Service Providers Researchers Students…

Read More

Announcing the 32nd Annual SoCal Alzheimer’s Research Conference

By Commentary, Community Events, In the News

JOIN US FOR A FREE VIRTUAL CONFERENCE: “Alzheimer’s from all angles” About the Conference Join Alzheimer’s Orange County and UCI MIND for the 32nd Annual Southern California Alzheimer’s Disease Research Conference. This free, half-day, virtual conference will cover a wide range of topics concerning Alzheimer’s disease, from updates on research, to treatments, diagnostics, risk factors, and genetic resilience. The impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on brain health will also be discussed. Friday, September 10, 2021, 8AM-12PM PT Free and open to the public Livestreamed on Facebook and YouTube Who Should Attend? Healthcare Providers Senior and Social Service Providers Researchers Students…

Read More

They Have Alzheimer’s. This Clinical Trial May Be a Last Hope.

By Commentary, In the News

The single most consistent barrier to progress in Alzheimer’s disease treatment development is low rates of participation in research. To learn about clinical trials at UCI MIND, visit https://www.mind.uci.edu/research-studies/participate/. To enroll in the C2C Registry and give researchers permission to let you know about new studies for which you might be eligible, visit c2c.uci.edu.

Read More

Anti-Asian American Hate Crimes Bill

By Commentary, COVID-19, In the News

Contributed by Hye-Won (Grace) Shin, PhD UCI MIND stands against racism, hate and violence. We laud the US Senate overwhelmingly passing the anti-Asian American hate crime bill Thursday, April 22, 2021. We stand with our Asian American researchers, physician scientists, research participants, patients and their caregivers and our broader Asian community members. As we painfully witnessed, hate crimes, physical attacks and deplorable rhetoric against Asians across the United States have escalated. According to the research report by the Center for the Study of Hate & Extremism at California State University, San Bernardino, hate crimes targeting Asians in the first quarter…

Read More

UCI MIND investigators develop new “platform model” to study late-onset Alzheimer’s disease

By Commentary, In the News

Contributed by Stefania Forner, PhD Most cases of Alzheimer’s disease (AD) are late-onset and occur sporadically; however, the majority of AD animal models are based on rare genetic mutations, making them good models of the less common familial AD, which accounts for 1% of all cases. As treatments effective in these mouse models have proven ineffective in humans, there is a clear need to develop new models that better represent the more common, late-onset sporadic form of AD. With this in mind, my colleagues and I at UCI MIND used a different approach in a recent study published in Nature…

Read More

UCI MIND Annual Report 2020: Excellence through Adversity

By Commentary, COVID-19, In the News

UCI MIND Annual Report 2020: Excellence through Adversity Dear Friend of UCI MIND, The COVID-19 pandemic has impacted every facet of life, especially for families enduring Alzheimer’s disease and related dementias. In 2020 alone, deaths due to Alzheimer’s increased 16% in the United States. Caregivers were forced to adapt how they manage care and cope with burden, while many endured painful separation from loved ones. Researchers faced delays and challenges in continuing our work. Yet, the past year has further ignited in us an urgency to discover solutions for Alzheimer’s disease and related dementias and improve the lives of those…

Read More

Minorities Receive Less Timely Dementia Diagnoses Than Whites

By Carousel Slider, Commentary, In the News

An accompanying editorial in JAMA Neurology noted that the study apparently is the first to focus on disparities related to “time to diagnosis and comprehensiveness of evaluation” of dementia. Claudia Kawas, M.D., a [professor], geriatric neurologist and researcher at the University of California, Irvine, and other authors of the editorial … point to the need for more diversity in dementia research — particularly as the aging U.S. population grows more diverse.

Read More

Join us for UCI Giving Day on Wednesday, April 28!

By Commentary, Community Events

COVID-19 has introduced tremendous uncertainty into our lives. It has made life challenging for many, none more than families facing Alzheimer’s disease and related dementias. Yet, one certainty remains – brain diseases will devastate our increasingly older population…unless researchers find solutions. UCI MIND remains focused on these efforts. To support the scientists, students, and programs across our great university, donate to dementia research on #UCIGivingDay coming up on Wednesday, April 28th. Help us rise to the challenge and unlock a $2,500 gift in support of Alzheimer’s research from Belmont Village by being one of the first 50 donors to UCI…

Read More

Training for Professionals serving Individuals with Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities

By Commentary, Community Events

Our community partners, Alzheimer’s Orange County, the UCI Down Syndrome Program at UCI MIND, the Regional Center of Orange County and the Down Syndrome Association of Orange County, have provided an ongoing education and support program to individuals and families living with Down syndrome and Alzheimer’s disease. To learn more, visit: https://www.alzoc.org/resources/idd/ There will be a three-part training series offered in May for those working in group homes, day programs, & other agencies. The flyer is listed below and the PDF is accessible here >

Read More

Sex differences in hallmarks of Alzheimer’s disease: new study finds faster tau accumulation in female brains

By Commentary, Community Events, In the News

Contributed by Ashley A. Keiser, PhD A new study from researchers in Sweden published in Brain finds faster accumulation of a major hallmark of Alzheimer’s disease, neurofibrillary protein aggregates containing tau in female, compared with male brains. Researchers also found greater memory impairments in women with Alzheimer’s disease. Sex differences in Alzheimer’s disease risk have been extensively reported. Particularly, women exhibit greater cognitive impairment and the rate of acceleration of impairment is observed to exceed men. Women are also twice as likely to be diagnosed with Alzheimer’s disease. Although previous cross-sectional studies that capture a single data point in time…

Read More

UCI MIND faculty member Dr. Tahseen Mozaffar awarded $4.2M grant to study rare muscle disorder affecting aging Americans

By Carousel Slider, Commentary, In the News

UCI School of Medicine Tahseen Mozaffar, MD, a professor of neurology and director of the Division of Neuromuscular Disorders and the UCI-MDA ALS and Neuromuscular Center at UCI’s School of Medicine will lead a study on sporadic inclusion body myositis (sIBM), which affects aging adults causing asymmetric muscle weakness and severe disability. Currently untreatable, sporadic inclusion body myositis (sIBM) causes muscle weakness and severe disability Irvine, CA – April 6, 2021 – The National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases has awarded UCI a 5-year, $4.2 million grant to study sporadic inclusion body myositis (sIBM), which affects aging adults…

Read More

Tracking the Alzheimer’s-Down syndrome connection

By Carousel Slider, Commentary, In the News

By the time they’re 40, most people with Down syndrome develop beta amyloid plaques in the brain — a key characteristic of Alzheimer’s disease. Scientists believe this is because they have an extra copy of chromosome 21, which carries an amyloid-producing gene. Many people with Down syndrome do develop Alzheimer’s disease, but some manage to avoid the devastating neurodegenerative consequences despite having these plaques in their brains. To learn more about the connection between Down syndrome and Alzheimer’s disease, UCI School of Medicine researchers are spearheading a major international research effort that will follow hundreds of adults with the syndrome…

Read More

Additional Vaccination Information

By Commentary, COVID-19, In the News

Contributed by Orange County Aging Services Collaborative It is important that our most vulnerable community members have access to COVID-19 vaccination appointments.  The Abrazar team can assist clients with scheduling an appointment.  If needed, transportation can also be scheduled.  Please note that the age eligibility is now 50+ (see below for other eligible community members).   VACCINATION APPOINTMENTS & ADDITIONAL INFORMATION: Call Abrazar’s COVID-19 Vaccination Call Center at (714) 278-4670. All questions can be sent to covidinfo@abrazarinc.com Call Center Team Members are bilingual and speak English, Spanish and Vietnamese. Referrals for other languages can be made. Case managers and family members can call…

Read More

Carol Choi Named District 74 Woman of Distinction

By Commentary, In the News

UC Irvine’s very own Carol Choi has been named among the 74th Assembly District 2021 Women of Distinction by Assemblywoman Cottie Petrie-Norris. The annual recognition occurs each March in honor of Women’s History Month to recognize women “who have shown extraordinary work, mentorship and leadership.” For those who are privileged to know and work with Carol Choi, this honor comes as no surprise. Carol embodies leadership through service on several committees at UC Irvine, including as a University Trustee. Additionally, Carol serves as Board Chair of the Korean American Alumni Chapter of the Alumni Association whose Founding President, Alexander Kim,…

Read More

Introducing the new Alzheimers.gov!

By Commentary

Contributed by the National Institute on Aging: NIA is pleased to announce Alzheimers.gov, a new website designed to educate and support people whose lives are touched by Alzheimer’s disease and related dementias. The website serves as the federal government portal for dementia information and resources. To develop Alzheimers.gov, we collaborated with people living with dementia, caregivers, advocates, researchers, and others to ensure an informative, easy-to-use, and empowering website. We are delighted to share it with you. Whether you are living with dementia, a family member or friend, health care professional, researcher, or advocate, Alzheimers.gov is designed for you. Explore the…

Read More

12th Annual Emerging Scientists Symposium

By In the News

Last week, UCI MIND’s trainee-led organization REMIND hosted their 12th Annual Emerging Scientists Symposium. The event was hosted virtually on Zoom for the first time and featured six trainee presentations: Sepideh Kiani Shabestari in Dr. Blurton-Jones' lab, Emily Miyoshi in Dr. Swarup's lab, Michael Neel in Dr. Monuki's lab, Dr. Christian Crouzet in Dr. Choi's lab, Dr. Angela Gomez in Dr. Tenner's lab, and Dr. Atena Zahedi in Dr. Anderson's lab. Presentations were followed by a trainee poster competition with innovative research projects on Alzheimer's disease and other neurological disorders and a keynote lecture from Dr. Tony Wyss-Coray from Stanford...

Read More

World Down Syndrome Day 2021

By Commentary

Yesterday, March 21st, was World Down Syndrome Day, a dedicated day to advocate for the rights of people with Down syndrome. Did you know that people with Down syndrome are at significantly increased risk to develop Alzheimer’s dementia? In this video clip, Paula Gann, mother of a daughter with Down syndrome and member of the California Governor’s Task Force on Alzheimer’s Prevention & Preparedness, shares how she and her daughter Kyle are working with UCI MIND researchers to advance knowledge, treatment, and care for people with Down syndrome and Alzheimer’s disease. To learn more about Down syndrome research at UCI…

Read More

Leslie Thompson Tackles Huntington’s Disease One Gene at a Time

By Carousel Slider, Commentary, In the News

The UCI professor has dedicated her career to finding answers to a rare genetic disease’s most crucial questions. An estimated 30,000 genes make up the human genome, with an individual’s entire uniqueness created by genetic mutations. From tissues and blood as well as distinctive physical features, like eye and hair color to temperament and so much more, genes are the coded instructions for building an entire person. But sometimes those instructions contain errors and genes can mutate to form many different things, including diseases. One such disease, Huntington’s disease, is a rare, inherited disease triggered by a single genetic mutation…

Read More

UCI MIND: Anti-Racist, Anti-Violence, Anti-Hate

By Commentary

  Research aims to gain knowledge for the betterment of humankind. UCI MIND is committed to research to discover solutions for Alzheimer’s disease and other age-related neurodegenerative diseases. The risk and burden of these diseases are not evenly distributed among American communities. It is critical that research be inclusive and diverse, and representative of our richly diverse nation. Many barriers to participation in research exist, especially from American communities of color. These barriers are exacerbated by health and healthcare disparities that must be overcome to fulfill our mission of a world without Alzheimer’s disease. Similarly, political and cultural barriers must be overcome to ensure racial justice,…

Read More