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Commentary

Yes! A positive Phase 3 treatment study for symptoms of dementia

By | Commentary, In the News

Contributed by David Sultzer, MD, Professor of Psychiatry & Human Behavior Last week, Acadia Pharmaceuticals announced findings from its trial of pimavanserin for treatment of delusions and hallucinations related to dementia: Participants treated with pimavanserin had better outcomes than those treated with placebo. The study design was different from usual treatment comparisons of drug and placebo.  In this trial, all participants with psychosis symptoms along with Alzheimer’s disease or another cognitive disorder were treated with pimavanserin for 12 weeks.  Those who showed improvement were then assigned to either continue taking the drug or cross over to placebo treatment.  The study…

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What lifestyle factors increase and decrease risk for Alzheimer’s disease?

By | Commentary, Community Events

What lifestyle factors increase and decrease risk for Alzheimer’s disease? October 25th Research Conference #SpeakerSpotlight: Dr. Rebecca Gottesman is a board-certified Neurologist and Professor of Neurology and Epidemiology at Johns Hopkins University. Her research focuses on the short-term and long-term cognitive effects of heart disease and stroke. She uses a combination of clinical studies in patients and epidemiological studies to evaluate the impact of heart disease on the brain. In the session, “Risk and Prevention Across the Lifespan,” Dr. Gottesman will discuss the link between heart health and brain health and identify lifestyle factors that increase and decrease risk for…

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How can “smart” technology be used to detect cognitive problems?

By | Commentary, Community Events

How can “smart” technology be used to detect cognitive problems? October 25th Research Conference #SpeakerSpotlight: Dr. Rhoda Au is a Professor of Anatomy & Neurobiology, Neurology and Epidemiology at Boston University and has served as an investigator on the Framingham Heart Study since 1990, conducting research related to cognitive aging and dementia. Dr. Au’s research focuses on a how “bigdata” analytics can better inform our understanding of Alzheimer’s disease. In the session, “Detection in the Digital Era,” Dr. Au will discuss how innovative technology can be used to track cognitive performance in older adults. Attendees will learn how digital technologies…

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How are brain scans improving our understanding of Alzheimer’s disease?

By | Commentary, Community Events

How are brain scans improving our understanding of Alzheimer’s disease? October 25th Research Conference #SpeakerSpotlight: Dr. William Jagust is a Professor of Public Health and Neuroscience at UC Berkeley and heads the national Alzheimer’s Disease Neuroimaging Initiative’s (ADNI) Core Laboratory for PET imaging. His laboratory was the first to describe Alzheimer’s-related hippocampal atrophy quantified with MRI and has continued to pioneer approaches using brain imaging to improve understanding of aging and dementia. In the session “Brain Scans and Biomarkers,” Dr. Jagust will describe how brain imaging has helped advance the field and discuss the strengths and challenges of brain scan…

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How are donated human brains used to study Alzheimer’s disease?

By | Commentary, Community Events

How are donated human brains used to study Alzheimer’s disease? October 25th Research Conference #SpeakerSpotlight: Dr. Julie Schneider is a board-certified Geriatric Neurologist and Neuropathologist, Professor of Pathology and Neurological Sciences at Rush University, and Associate Director of the Rush Alzheimer’s Disease Center. Dr. Schneider’s research focuses on linking pathology with risk factors and brain imaging to improve understanding of cognitive aging and dementia. Brain donation has been an invaluable resource for researchers to better understand the causes of and treatment options for Alzheimer’s disease and related dementias. In the session, “Gifted Brains Yield Priceless Gains,” Dr. Schneider will discuss…

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Summer 2019 MIND Matters Newsletter

By | Commentary, Community Events, In the News

In this issue of MIND Matters: UCI MIND Scientists Discover Exercise Can Reprogram Genes Welcome, New Faculty & Staff New FDA Black Box Warning for Insomnia Medications Announcing the 10th Annual UCI MIND Gala Honorees… And more! Download Newsletter >   Upcoming Events:   Facebook LIVE Q&A Series: “What have researchers learned from brain donations?” Friday, September 6  |  9:00-9:30 am |  UCI MIND Facebook Page Follow @UCIrvineMIND to receive notifications when we go LIVE Live online Q&A with Edwin Monuki, MD, PhD, Professor and Warren L. Bostick Chair of Pathology in the UCI School of Medicine.  Attend the video live on our Facebook page or view archived…

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Commentary on the link between brain disease and sleep-wake systems

By | Commentary, In the News

Contributed by Bryce Mander, PhD Our colleagues at UCSF recently published findings in the journal Alzheimer’s and Dementia examining how tau pathology in different brain diseases – Alzheimer’s disease, progressive supranuclear palsy, and corticobasal degeneration – impacts brain cells that are in charge of keeping us awake. This study reported several important findings: In all three diseases, there was a reduction in brain cells that help promote cortical arousal. In all three diseases, tau pathology was quite substantial in several of the wake-promoting cells in the brainstem region. Tau pathology in the brainstem in Alzheimer’s disease was associated with a much…

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